One red companion female and one red SHOW male by Kaden, CH Mueller’s Jewel of Kei V Kelview out of Ch.Marquis My Heart Will Go On AVAILABLE

“Remy” is out of Ch. Marquis I am Arya by Gch. Raushunds Aguilo Marquis. She is bred by Kelly & Linda Marquis and Susan & Chelsea James, Raindance Dobermans.See the puppy page for details

Remy was bred to Kaden, CH Mueller’s Jewel of Kei V Kelview . On May 10 2 red girls, 3 red boys, 4 black boys arrived!

See the puppy page for new STACKED pictures and available puppies!

“Remy” is out of Ch. Marquis I am Arya by Gch. Raushunds Aguilo Marquis. She is bred by Kelly & Linda Marquis and Susan & Chelsea James, Raindance Dobermans.See the puppy page for details

HOW LONG HAVE YOU BEEN IN THE BREED?
My parents began breeding Dobermans in 1975.

HOW DID YOU CHOOSE YOUR KENNEL NAME?
My mother and father discussed many names and decided that since our family name, Marquis, implies royalty and quality it would be the name of our kennel.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THE DOBERMAN PINSCHER AS YOUR BREED?
Prior to Dobermans, my parents had Arabian horses. My parents were attracted to Arabian horses because they liked the style of the Blue Blood Arabian head. The head is well chiseled and has beautiful dark wide-set eyes with flaring nostrils. They tell me that this was one of the key reasons they were attracted to Dobes; their head is well chiseled, dry, determined and intense. They also liked the fact they require minimal grooming.

Because I had grown up with Dobermans, I never questioned my desire to own them. I just always had them. I did venture into other breeds, but found my heart was always with the Dobes. I love their athleticism, musculature, and trainability. They are intelligent, intuitive, and eager to please. Combined with their air of nobility, what’s not to love? I admire a Doberman that is alert, intelligent, strong willed, level-headed combined with a sharp temperament and a sense of humor.

WHAT WERE YOUR GOALS WHEN YOU STARTED BREEDING AND SHOWING YOUR DOBERMANS?
My parent’s initially focused on breeding Dobes that were sound in mind and body. In the 70’s Dobes were long lived (13-15 years), so that was not an issue at the time. Dobes were much sharper back then. We had a couple of Furstenfeld dogs from Germany and my parents never bred them because they were too intense and determined. My parents strove to balance between sharpness, loyalty and trainability. When they began showing their dogs, they focused on maintaining their heads, fronts, heavy bone along with structure that was pleasing to their eyes.

In my late teens my mom started taking my opinions in regards to the breeding program into consideration. When I was in college, my mom and I made breeding decisions together. Once I began earning an income, I was able to help finance the breedings. This helped open our possibilities and gave us more dogs to choose from.

I believe, my professional handling really helped take our breeding program to the next level. Because I was showing every week and traveling the country I had the chance to see a wide spectrum of Dobermans. Over time, I could see consistency in certain lines.

Professional handling also exposed me to different breed types. It was my job to well-represent Doberman breeders that had various interpretations of the standard. Their priorities were different than mine and different from what I had learned from my parents. For instance, I learned that straighter animals consistently move more soundly than angled animals. Straighter animals grow old more comfortably that angled animals (An animal with a lot of rear angulation combined with a long lower thigh has a difficult time walking and keeping its rear underneath them the older they get. In addition, their front and pasterns generally break down.). Dogs with extremely heavy bone are not generally as fast and agile as dogs lighter boned.

By handling for my clients I had the benefit of seeing form versus function in my back yard. Watchingdogs run is highly educational as well as a great joy. It was my job to represent every dog to the best of my abilities and to believe that every dog I walked into the ring with was the best representative of our breed. My mind had to recognize the best traits of my animal and justify why those traits made my animal better than the others. It gave me a new appreciation for a different type of Doberman. I got to witness first-hand the benefits/drawbacks of straight versus angled and heavy boned versus lighter boned. Watching dogs run in the field, shows you exactly why balance is a key element in any breeding program. Whatever you preferences are, you must always consider the overall balance of the animal.

WAS THERE A PERSON OR PERSONS WHO INFLUENCED YOU IN YOUR BREEDING AND/OR SHOWING DECISIONS?
My parents were very influenced by dogs bred by Peggy Adamson, Eleanor Brown, and Mary Rodgers. Damasyn’s had style (the look of eagles), gorgeous heads, intensity, good bone and up on leg (To this day, my mom openly admits she prefers a Doberman up on leg!). Brown’s were substantial and heavy-boned. Marienburg’s were a good combination of both.

WHO WERE YOUR MENTORS AND WHAT DID YOU LEARN FROM THEM?
My Parents acknowledge the following individuals as their mentors:

My parents traveled with Nan Woods of Zenodobe Kennel in the 70’s. My parents say that she was the most well prepared and dedicated person they knew. Her dogs were ultimately conditioned. My father says, Best of Breed wins were more important to her than Group or BIS wins. They said once she did not stay for the group because she had to exercise and feed her dogs on schedule! They first met Nan when she was in her 60’s, smoking her tiparillo cigars. She was of the debutant status, yet smoked those cigars. My parents describe her as a class act and a tough lady who loved her dogs. They once told me how she used to take two intact, hot tempered males hiking up the mountain every day! She passed away in 2010. She will always be remembered as a tough lady who loved her dobes. They are thankful for all Nan taught them and feel privileged to have known her.

Carol Petruzzo has unlimited information on ancestry and the Damasyn dogs and pedigrees. She and Marge Brooks are a wealth of Doberman knowledge. Damasyn was the look/style that attracted my parents to Dobes. Carol was there for them to learn from and still is a wonderful mentor for anyone interested in learning the Doberman breed. Carol’s style of Doberman is still one I see in my mind’s eye as the make and shape of dog that I want to breed.

My parents were close friends with Tony and Sheila DiNardo.They enjoyed one another’s company and traveled to shows together for many years. They taught my parents a lot about the show ring and the qualities that make great dogs great winners.Ch. Eagle’s Devil D will forever be imprinted in my head as an ideal Doberman.

When it came to grooming Don Simmons was their mentor. Don was a perfectionist. “Every hair counts when competing in the ring,” he used to say. Don taught my mother how to groom a Doberman to perfection. It always amazes me how much hair she takes off of a short coated dog.

HOW DO YOU MAKE THE DECISION TO DO THE BREEDING YOU DO FOR YOUR KENNEL?
When I was a kid my mother and father obviously made the breeding decisions. Today, we all discuss the pros and cons of our breedings. My mother has always been the one to put in the blood sweat and tears in the whelping box. She is a wealth of knowledge when it comes to anything having to do with health and whelping. My father judges all across the country and in different parts of the world. He gets to put his hands on some dogs that we only see in magazines. And I see a multitude of dogs day in and day out as a handler.

One thing that we all agree on, is that we do not want to sacrifice temperament. At the end of day, the puppies you breed are either your or someone else’s companions. It also doesn’t matter how beautiful a Doberman is, if it doesn’t project itself in the ring, no one is going to notice the animal. And if it doesn’t act like a Doberman, I don’t want to own it.

I know there has been a lot of discussion about the declining health in our breed. Unfortunately, I also see a major decline in the temperament of the breed. Dobermans are supposed to be confidant, levelheaded, self-assured, with the look of eagles. Many times I’ve been grading a litter trying to make my pick and I have two equal animals, and for me, my final decision usually comes down to temperament. It’s a huge component that many breeders overlook.

Another area of genetics that I have a difficult time overlooking is shoulders. It is a key component for me in breeding Dobermans. As a kid, I remember being told that well laid-back shoulders are recessive. If you continually breed for it, you will be lucky to have even 40 percent of your litter with the 45-degree layback called for in our standard. Over the years I have found that the well laid back shoulders are often accompanied by soft top lines, long backs, bad pasterns, and over-angulated rears and sloppy movement. As a breeder, I constantly struggle with good neck set, tight shoulders with 45-degree layback versus, short backed, tight-skinned, straight and sound. It is difficult as a breeder to get this winning combination. Therefore, in my breeding, I would have to say that I breed for heavy bone,good front, good temperament, well set neck into shoulders, combined with a dog that is one piece.

WHAT DO YOU CONSIDER BEFORE DOING ANY BREEDING ALL?
Overall, we consider bone, front, health, temperament, and soundness and balance.

More specifically, I look for consistency. Dogs like Cactus Cash that are proven, make it easy. Eddie stamped his get. When you bred to Eddie you had a pretty good idea what the offspring would look like. If the dog is not proven, it is extremely important to look at sire, damn, and siblings. First, I look at the pedigree to see if the dog I’m considering breeding to is a fluke of nature or if there is consistency. I want to know what the mother, father, brothers and sisters look like. If the mother, father, brothers and sisters are similar, chances are you’ll get what you’re looking for when breeding to that dog. On the other hand if you have an outstanding dog, whose mother, father, brothers and sisters are mediocre at best, chances are that dog will not throw the phenotype you are looking for. Health testing is also very important. If the health tests aren’t complementary, the breeding doesn’t happen.

DO YOU FEEL KNOWING THE PEDIGREE OF BOTH PARENTS AND THEIR ANCESTORS ARE IMPORTANT IN MAKING YOUR DECISION ON BREEDING?
Knowing and understanding the pedigree is critical to our decision-making especially for health reasons. Dogs are not as long lived as they were 40 years ago but we are greatly improving comparing to the 1980’s. I also like to look at the whole picture. I want to look at the sire, damn, grandparents, brothers and sisters. Again, I am looking for consistency. There are times that I will breed to a dog because I have consistently seen in their get a quality that I am looking for when breeding my bitch. I have bred to a dog with great bone, a beautiful head and great coat and pigmentation that was steep in front…that came from a line with many steep fronts, with the hope that my fronts will come through. However, when I breed the puppies from that litter, I will be sure to go into a different line or try to double back into my line.
DO YOU FEEL MEDICAL TESTING IS IMPORTANT AND WHAT DO YOU THINK ABOUT ALL THE TESTING THAT IS OUT THERE FOR US TO DO?
I feel we are fortunate to have this information so we can do our best to help avoid the problems that are avoidable. The unfortunate side of this is the scrutiny placed on breeders that have animals with unfavorable test results. I especially commend breeders that post their health tests that are not favorable. It is a sign of someone upfront that is truly putting it all out there trying to make a difference and setting the tone for others who would be courageous enough to follow.

We all have had dogs die younger than we would like. Years ago we asked questions but got no clear answers. Now we are being given tools to help us improve in the health of our dogs. Though some illnesses remain inexplicable. This is the only way we are going to learn. As long as a breeder makes efforts to breed to animals that do not share these same problems then they are working to improve the breed and their line.

I also find it unfortunate that when many new health tests are released, people focus on the negative. We need to simply look at it scientifically and figure ways to help one another decrease the odds of our dogs being affected by these diseases. Our genetic problems develop over time and we need to understand that it takes times to bring about change.Health should be treated like everything else in breeding; your goal should be to maintain the good without doubling up on the bad.

WHAT TESTING DO YOU DO AND WHY?
We test all our bitches forthyroid, VWD, Moors, Hips, as well as performing a 24-Holter, and EKG. We also require that the stud owners perform these tests as well. Although performing these test does not guarantee that the puppies will not have these diseases (with the exception of VWD), they can at times make us aware of a condition that we would not have been aware of had we not done the testing. For example, we once did an EKG on a bitch we were prepared to breed and found that she had an enlarged heart. We made the decision, not to breed her. Many years later, we discovered her father and his two brothers all developed heart disease in their later years. We did not continue to breed that line. If we hadn’t done the testing, we wouldn’t have discovered the health condition until it was too late. I am thankful we had that information and ran the tests we did. I feel we saved ourselves and puppy buyers’future heartache. Although it is devastating to discover an animal you own has a health defect, in the end you are better off having this information sooner versus later.

GIVE THE FANCY SOME OF THE THOUGHTS YOU HAVE LEARNED OVER THE YEARS WITH THE BREEDING PROGRAM THAT HAVE WORKED FOR YOU?
I feel the best outcomes I have had when breeding are when I consider the package as a whole. Do not breed for parts. Also, always remember that good shoulders are a recessive gene.
I recommend rereading the Doberman standard at least once a year regardless of how long you have been breeding. We all develop a certain look that appeals to our eye. We need to respect the standard and breed to it.
It is a ritual for Jeff and I to read the standard on our way to/or from the national every year. It remindsus of what we are breeding for and brings up great discussion. There are aspects of the standard that I may have overlooked or undervalued as well as aspects that I may place too much emphasis on.
DO YOU HAVE ANY FAVORITE BREEDING YOU HAVE DONE AND WHY DID YOU CHOOSE THIS BREEDING AND WHAT DID YOU GET THAT YOU LIKED SO MUCH?
One of my favorite earlier breedings was to Ch. Aleph Godol’s Status Symbol. Prior to breeding to this dog, our breeding tended to be front heavy with a tendency to be long, soft bodied and sloppy. I originally wanted to breed to Victor, he was a captivating show dog, who was very clean, smooth and square and tight bodied. Unfortunately Victor died tragically atthe age of four.

I later had the honor of showing Ch. Aleph Godol’sStatus Symbol, “Oscar.” A Victor son, and he too was short backed, sound, and tight bodied. I bred an unfinished bitch, Marquis’ One & Only to Oscar. I couldn’t have been happier with the breeding. The litter produced Ch. Marquis Absolute Perfection (grandmother of the 2010 National Pilgrim host club specialty breed winner), Ch. Marquis Absolute Temptation, and Marquis Absolute Power. This combination produced, short backed, tight bodied, balanced, sound moving dogs with nice tight shoulders and good layback. Oscar was one of those dogs that produced good sound Dobermans in almost any bitch he was bred to. Prior to this breeding, our emphasis had always been on fronts, angles, and bone. I wanted a more unified animal and this decision led us down the right path

I was also very pleased with our breeding to Ch. Cambria’s Cactus Cash. We bred Ch. Marquis’ Absolute Perfection to Cactus Cash. That breeding produced Ch. Marquis’ Yes I Am (mother of Ch. Marquis’ Yes I am Charmed), Ch. Marquis All American Girl, and Ch. Marquis’ Keep it Precious. Once again, we got what we were hoping for. This was a beautiful combination, of proper fronts, angles, soundness, and unity. We later bred our Eddie daughter, Ch. Marquis’ Yes I am to Ch. Eastwick’s Meadow Monster which produced Ch. Marquis Yes I am Charmed. In my opinion, she is the best Doberman we have ever bred and one of the best Dobermans I have ever shown.

HAVE YOU EVER DONE A BREEDING THAT JUST DID NOT WORK AND WHY?
We did line breed a sire and damn. They both were lovely animals and the pedigree looked beautiful. The breeding did not work. We got soft temperaments and bad croups.
When I was in high school, my mom bred a nice bitch of ours to a good dog that was a top ten Doberman. Again, this breeding looked amazing on paper. Once again, the weaknesses were amplified, not to mention the fact that they all wanted to kill one another by 5 weeks of age! A nice bitch can be overwhelmed by her predecessors if there is too much commonality
My experiences have taught me that you need to be cautious when doing a line breeding. You need to be well educated on all the animals in the pedigree’s strengths and weaknesses, because not only are you doubling up on the good but you are doubling up on the bad.The genetics of your animal will most likely be dominated by the tightly line bred animal. Therefore, if you don’t want to lose what you have, don’t breed to a line bred animal. If you are looking to make a change, then by all means do it!
WHERE DO YOU SEE YOURSELF IN THE NEXT 5/10/20 YEARS WITH YOUR KENNEL, HANDLING AND YOU PERSONALLY?
I hope to be doing a lot more breeding. I have two daughters out of Ch. Marquis’ Yes I Am Charmed that I will be focused on breeding over the next couple of years. I look forward to experimenting with these two girls.
A goal of mine is to produce a good male. Most of our success in the whelping box has come in the form of bitches. You can have a lot more impact on the bred with a good male.
I also want to make sure that my good bitches have more opportunity to pass on their genes. Ch. Marquis’ Yes I Am only had two litters and Ch. Marquis’ Yes I Am Charmed only had one litter. Breeding and raising puppies is very time consuming, especially when you are a professional handler and on the road so much, but I don’t want to lose out on good genes. I had many of bitches where we’ve said, that’s okay, we’ll just breed her next cycle… then the next. Next thing you know, you regret not having bred more. That is a goal of mine, to make breeding a priority.
In terms of the show ring, the goals of my breeding program are to produce a Number One ranked Doberman, a Top Twenty winner, a national Grand Price Futurity winner, a national Winner’s Bitch, a national Winner’s Dog and a Westminster Best of Breed winner! I guess I have to go… I have a lot of work to do!
P.S. My mom’s goal is to be alive to witness all this!

Just two puppies left from Tali and Satish litter! Purple collar girl and multi-green collar boy available to approved show homes!

We are excited to announce two new litters of quality Dobermans are here!

Ch. Marquis’ Immortality V Rockadog (Tali) and Gch. Cardav’s Satish puppies were born June 29th…all black, 3 girls, 6 boys!

Ch. Marquis’ Immortality V Rockadog - “Tali”

Tali’s Pedigree

Gch. Cardav’s Satish

Gch. Cardav’s Satish

Am. GCh./Intl./UKC. Ch Cardav's Satish CGC, TDI, WAC

Satish’s Pedigree Satish photos courtesy of Kris Johnson ©

purple collar bitch 8 weeks

purple collar bitch

multi green collar dog 8 weeks

multi green collar dog

pink collar bitch 8 weeks

pink collar bitch

white collar bitch 8 weeks

white collar bitch

no collar dog 8 weeks

no collar dog

white collar dog 8 weeks

white collar dog

green collar dog 8 weeks

green collar dog

blue collar dog 8 weeks

blue collar dog

black collar dog 8 weeks

black collar dog

“Phoenix” Ch. Alisaton’s the Flight of the Phoenix and CH. Marquis N Rockadog’s Moody Blue puppy arrived July 25th, a red boy.

CH. Marquis N Rockadog's Moody Blue

CH. Marquis N Rockadog's Moody Blue

Moody Blue’s Pedigree

GCH Alisaton The Flight of The Phoenix

Phoenix Pedigree

Moody Blue and baby

For more information:

New Hampshire
Phone: 603-770-5607 or Email: Kelly Marquis  

Florida
Phone: 603-770-5577 or Email: Linda Marquis, Marquis Dobes  

This gallery contains 28 photos.

 

 

Marquis Dobe is pleased to announce that we have two new litters of champion quality dobermans available. The first litter is from a breeding of Ch. Marquis’ Immortality V Rockadog and Ch. Alisaton’s Flight of Phoenix. The second litter by Ch. Marquis I Am Saphira & Ch. Tiburon Arsenal. The later, is a repeat breeding of #2 Dobe Ch. Marquis Yes I Am Charmed. Visit the Puppies page for more details & photos.

Ch. Marquis’ Immortality V Rockadog - “Tali”

Ch. Alisaton’s Flight of Phoenix